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INFLAMMATION & SKIN AGING

Inflammation affects the skin in a myriad of ways, but is particularly damaging when combined with the effects of aging. However, there are many ways to remedy the causes of inflammation and to minimize its effects.

In this post, we will discuss how to recognize inflammation and why it is especially connected with the aging process. We also offer methods to reduce not only the appearance of inflammation, but the actual inflammatory process itself.

comparison of young and old face

IDENTIFYING INFLAMMATION

Inflammation is usually considered to be part of a skin disease, such as rosacea or acne, and it certainly is. However, ongoing inflammation affects every decline in skin health and is an important driver of skin aging. If inflammatory processes could be decreased – and they can! – then aging would be slowed, skin health would improve and beauty would increase.

Not only is inflammation present when it appears as redness, warmth, discomfort and swelling but it is also present, whether it is visible or not, during aging. Furthermore, stress from any cause is quite inflammatory. Inflammation accelerates aging, so much so that a new word was coined by scientists and doctors to describe this close connection – “inflammaging”. Inflammation and aging are so associated with one another that they can be spoken of as a single word.

INFLAMMATION AND AGE

Older persons have more inflammatory markers in their blood stream compared to younger persons. This is known to be true because these levels have been measured in large numbers of people. For those of the same age, persons with healthier skin and a healthier body have lower levels of inflammation compared to those with less healthy skin or bodies.

Even in groups of people of the same age and with the same medical problem – such as diabetes, for example – diabetics who have their condition under good control have fewer circulating inflammatory molecules than diabetics whose disease is under poor control. These levels also predict how rapidly health will decline unless interventions are taken.

woman meditating

CONTROLLING INFLAMMATION

There are many ways for an individual to decrease their personal level of inflammation. One solution is to take oral supplements, such as curcumin, which have been shown to decrease inflammation in the body. Another option is to adopt practices like meditation, yoga, mindfulness training and exercise, which decrease the body’s molecules that communicate stress and encourage inflammation in the skin and other tissues.

Many lifestyle modifiers working through epigenetics also positively impact the inflammatory process; some of these include diet, exercise, smoking cessation, stress reduction, social connection, spirituality and a positive outlook on life.

SKIN CARE AND INFLAMMATION

Topical skincare products are an accessible and effective way of reducing skin’s inflammation and improving skin aging, especially when they are of excellent quality. Many ingredients in skincare products reduce “inflammaging”. Some of these include ADVANCE+ Vitamin C, olive leaf extract/oleuropein, Vitamin E, Vitamin A, antioxidants and Centella asiatica. Additionally, using sunscreen lessens inflammation and decreases the risk of skin aging and skin cancer.

TREATING INFLAMMATION WITH iS CLINICAL SKINCARE

 All botanicals in iS CLINICAL products have antioxidant ability and double as anti-inflammatories. An iS CLINICAL product that is a hero in reducing inflammation is PRO-HEAL SERUM ADVANCE+. Other skin care products in the iS CLINICAL line with excellent anti-inflammatory activity include SUPER SERUM ADVANCE+EXTREME PROTECT SPF30ECLIPSE SPF50+GENEXC SERUM, WHITE LIGHTENING COMPLEX and REPARATIVE MOISTURE EMULSION.

Every individual has much more control over their own inflammatory processes than they may realize. With the correct knowledge and habits, it is easy to make positive impacts on ones skin aging, skin health and beauty every day.

For additional education, follow Dr. Charlene DeHaven on Instagram @CharleneDeHavenMD

MELANOMA / SKIN CANCER DETECTION AND PREVENTION MONTH

family posing and smiling togetherfamily smiling and posing together

Skin Cancer Prevention Tips From The Skin Cancer Foundation- May , 2018

Skin cancer is a disease that affects people of every age, gender and ethnicity. One in five Americans will develop skin cancer by the age of 70; in fact, more people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the U.S. than all other cancers combined.

But there is good news: Because skin cancer is chiefly a lifestyle disease, it is also highly preventable.  About 90 percent of nonmelanoma skin cancers and about 86 percent of melanomas are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Knowing the risk factors and practicing sun protection year-round are key to reducing your risk.

“It’s never too early or too late in life to start protecting your skin from sun damage,” says Deborah S. Sarnoff, MD, president of The Skin Cancer Foundation. “Parents and caregivers should teach children about sun protection at an early age and help them instill lifelong habits. And even after a lifetime of sun exposure, older people can stop further damage to their skin by making sun protection a priority.

examples of melanoma

Here are The Skin Cancer Foundation’s tips for reducing your skin cancer risk:

Seek the shade, especially between 10 AM and 4 PM when the sun is strongest. An extra rule of thumb is the “shadow rule.” If your shadow is shorter than you are, the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation is stronger; if your shadow is longer, UV radiation is less intense.

Do not burn. A person’s risk for melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, doubles if he or she had had five or more sunburns at any point in life.

Avoid tanning and UV tanning booths. UV radiation from tanning machines is known to cause cancer in humans. Indoor UV tanners are 74 percent more likely to develop melanoma, one of the deadliest forms of skin cancer, than those who have never tanned indoors. Tanning bed users are also 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma and 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma, two of the most common forms of skin cancer. The more time a person has spent tanning indoors, the higher the risk.

Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses. Clothing can be your most effective form of sun protection, so make the most of it with densely woven and bright- or dark-colored fabrics, which offer the best defense. The more skin you cover, the better, so choose long sleeves and long pants whenever possible.

Use a broad-spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher every day. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad-spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.

Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating. One eight-ounce bottle of sunscreen should provide two full days of sun protection.

Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreens may be used on babies over the age of six months, but they should also be protected by shade and clothing. Children are very sensitive to ultraviolet radiation – just one severe sunburn in childhood doubles the chances of developing melanoma later in life.

Examine your skin head to toe every month. While self-exams shouldn’t replace the important annual skin exam performed by a physician, they offer the best chance of detecting the early warning signs of skin cancer. If you notice any change in an existing mole or discover any new spot that doesn’t heal after several weeks, see a physician immediately.

Visit us at The Dermatology Center for your yearly skin checkup. Don’t let this simple visit interfere with your life!! Call us today at 540-370-9098 to schedule your body check.

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